If you only have 5 minutes, listen to a short clip of Dr. Judson Brewer’s Interview.

To learn more about Dr Judson Brewer’s Course, go to TheHug.com/DrJudsonBrewer

Dr Judson Brewer MD PhD is the Director of Research at the Center for Mindfulness and associate professor in medicine and psychiatry at UMass Medical School. He also is adjunct faculty at Yale University, and a research affiliate at MIT. A psychiatrist and internationally known expert in mindfulness training for addictions. He is a thought leader in the ‘science of self-mastery,” having combined nearly 20 years of experience with mindfulness training with his scientific research therein.

Brewer has developed and tested novel mindfulness programs for addictions, including both in-person and app-based treatments. He has also studied the underlying neural mechanisms of mindfulness using standard and real-time fMRI, and source-estimated EEG, and is currently translating these findings into clinical use. In 2012, Dr. Brewer  founded Claritas MindSciences to combine mindfulness and neurofeedback techniques for a variety of conditions; the latest apps are Craving to Quit and Eat Right Now.

Can we break bad habits by being more curious about them? Dr. Brewer studies the relationship between mindfulness and addiction — from smoking to overeating to all those other things we do even though we know they’re bad for us. Learn more about the mechanism of habit development and discover a simple but profound tactic that might help you beat your next urge to smoke, snack or check a text while driving.

He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, presented to the US President’s Office of National Drug Control Policy, trained US Olympic coaches, been featured on 60 minutes, at TED, TEDMED, TEDx, in Time magazine (top 100 new health discoveries of 2013), Forbes, Businessweek, NPR and the BBC among others. His forthcoming book is The Craving Mind: from cigarettes to smartphones to love, why we get hooked and how we can break bad habits (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017).

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